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New Movies: Release Calendar for September 18, Plus Where to Watch the Latest Films

Staying home? Good. Looking for something new to watch? Even better!

The Devil All The Time: Robert Pattinson as Preston Teagardin. Photo Cr. Glen Wilson/Netflix ? 2020

“The Devil All the Time”

Glen Wilson/Netflix

Staying home? Good. Looking for something new to watch while you do it? Even better! As the world shifts to accommodate a wide range of in-home viewing options for movie lovers, it’s not just platforms that are expanding, it’s the very type of films they host. There’s more than ever to sift through, and IndieWire is here to help you do just that.

This week’s new releases include streaming originals, fresh VOD offerings, festival favorites, new studio releases now available in the comfort of your own home, and a variety of exciting virtual cinema picks. Browse your options below.

Week of September 14 – September 20

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“All In: The Fight for Democracy” (directed by Liz Garbus and Lisa Cortes)
Distributor: Amazon Studios
Where to Find It: Select theaters, streaming on Amazon Prime Video

At times, “All In: The Fight for Democracy” plays like a survey for an introductory class in voting rights — a noble aim, albeit one that doesn’t necessarily make for inspired filmmaking. The film’s most moving points are its flashes of humanity, which reveal the personal toll that racism and racist voting policies take. Abrams’ own narrative is especially illuminating; as a skilled rhetorical politician she is an expert at weaving her story into broader themes. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Antebellum” (directed by Gerard Bush and Christopher Renz)
Distributor: Lionsgate
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

Even the most satisfying payoffs feels like missed opportunities, if only because we don’t get to see them along with an audience roaring in approval. That’s not fair, but what has been this year? Initially slated to be released this past April before it was delayed until the end of the most contentious summer in recent American history, “Antebellum” might have been a movie that met this awful moment, but its confused attempt at seeing yesterday in today resolves as a throwback to a time when anyone could actually overlook it in good faith. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Antebellum”

“Blackbird” (directed by Roger Michell)
Distributor: Screen Media
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various VOD platforms

The decision has already been made by the time Roger Michell’s “Blackbird” begins. Months of debates and discussion are long over, and now it’s time for the hard-headed Lily (Susan Sarandon) to die. It’s hard to imagine anything screaming “tough watch!” as much as “remake of a Danish euthanasia drama” — but Michell, screenwriter Christian Torpe (adapting his own original screenplay), and a talented cast strike a delicate balance in a domestic drama that ably combines heartbreak and humor. Twists abound, but emotions and events are never allowed to careen out of control, and Michell’s nimble direction keeps the ship right even through the stormiest of sequences. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Devil All the Time” (directed by Antonio Campos)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

There is no reason to care about anyone in Antonio Campos’ “The Devil All the Time,” a sweaty, bloated mess of a movie that flushes a knockout ensemble down the drain. More a pileup of scenes and tragedies strung together than the Altmanesque kaleidoscope of intersecting lives it could have been, this slog of an adaptation from Donald Ray Pollock’s terrific Appalachian gothic is dead from the start, with stars like Tom Holland and Robert Pattinson eagerly doing their best to resuscitate the corpse for a nearly two-and-a-half-hour running time. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Nest” (directed by Sean Durkin)
Distributor: IFC Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Writer-director Sean Durkin’s mesmerizing debut “Martha Marcy May Marlene” may put unreasonable expectations on his long-awaited sophomore effort, “The Nest,” because the masterful psychological thriller that put Durkin on the map has a lot more going for it than the sleek, contained period piece that has followed it up. However, “Martha” casts an unmistakable shadow on “The Nest,” which displays the same complex formalism of its predecessor while settling into a more conventional mold. In Durkin’s icy, slow-burn drama, every frame benefits from masterful composition. Carrie Coon and Jude Law deliver sizzling performances defined by mutual indignation, but it ultimately amounts to little more than talent spinning its wheels on both sides of the camera. Read IndieWire’s full review.

the nest

“The Nest”

“The Secrets We Keep” (directed by Yuval Adler)
Distributor: Bleecker Street
Where to Find It: Select theaters

A listless, half-baked, vaguely Hitchcockian thriller about a Romani Holocaust survivor (a flushed Noomi Rapace) who’s trying to make a new life for herself in a Mayberry-like American suburb during the 1950s, Yuval Adler’s “The Secrets We Keep” hinges on a single question that it struggles to ask with the weight it demands and/or answer with the grindhouse-like glee it encourages: Is the friendly-seeming family man whose accented voice she recognizes in town one afternoon (Joel Kinnaman) actually one of the Nazi goons who executed her sister towards the end of the war? Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Way I See It” (directed by Dawn Porter)
Distributor: Focus Features
Where to Find It: Select theaters

There’s a cruel irony to the way Dawn Porter’s “The Way I See It” unfolds: this documentary about presidential photographer Pete Souza, who served as the official shutterbug for both the Reagan and Obama administrations, never quite knows where to focus. The problem is not that Porter, who this year has already given us “John Lewis: Good Trouble,” is unclear on the power of the images she’s following, but that the filmmaker seems distracted by the sheer amount of visual splendor she’s got at her disposal. Souza’s work has already filled seven books, innumerable newspaper pages, and one very popular Instagram account, a single film doesn’t seem fit to do it justice. That Souza’s legacy is so caught up in that of Obama’s doesn’t help matters either, and if both Souza and Porter are prone to turning “The Way I See It” into a doc about the former president, well, it’s understandable. It’s not entirely forgivable, though. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Alive” (directed by Rob Grant)
Distributor: Cranked Up Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various VOD platforms

“Alone” (directed by John Hyams)
Distributor: Magnet Releasing
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various VOD platforms

“H Is for Happiness” (directed by John Sheedy)
Distributor: Universal Pictures
Where to Find It:
Various VOD and digital platforms

“Lost Girls & Love Hotels” (directed by William Olsson)
Distributor: Astrakan Releasing
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

“Murder in the Woods” (directed by Luis Iga Garza)
Distributor: Rezinate Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

“No Escape” (directed by Will Wernick)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

“The Racer” (directed by Kieron J. Walsh)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures and Blinder Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various VOD platforms

“Wheels” (directed by Paul Starkman)
Distributor: 1091 Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

Also available this week:

“My Name Is Pedro” (directed by Lillian LaSalle)
Distributor: Sweet 180 Productions
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Check out more information about the rest of September’s new releases below.

Week of September 7 – September 13

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“All In: The Fight for Democracy” (directed by Liz Garbus and Lisa Cortes)
Distributor: Amazon Studios
Where to Find It: Select theaters (streaming on Amazon Prime Video next week)

At times, “All In: The Fight for Democracy” plays like a survey for an introductory class in voting rights — a noble aim, albeit one that doesn’t necessarily make for inspired filmmaking. The film’s most moving points are its flashes of humanity, which reveal the personal toll that racism and racist voting policies take. Abrams’ own narrative is especially illuminating; as a skilled rhetorical politician she is an expert at weaving her story into broader themes. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Broken Hearts Gallery” (directed by Natalie Krinsky)
Distributor: Sony Pictures
Where to Find It: Select theaters

What this sweet, fleet-footed little trifle does capture is how to start a whole new you after you and me is no more. This certainly makes for an overly idealistic experience, but “Broken Hearts Gallery” is a far-cry from the algorithm-driven uncanny valleys of romantic human behavior as seen on Netflix’s versions of the same kind of film, and it features a totally delightful turn from Geraldine Viswanathan as the central brokenhearted who hatches an enviably creative way to move on. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Jimmy Carter Rock & Roll President” (directed by Mary Wharton)
Distributor: Greenwich Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus virtual cinema options

The movie provides a breezy contrast to the dumbing-down of American leadership in the Trump era, and makes a canny argument for cultural exchange as a far better bargaining chip than anything found in “The Art of the Deal”: After all, Carter played country music for Den Xiaping while softening America’s relationship with China, which seems like a much better approach to diplomacy than anything on the 45th president’s Twitter feed. “The world may not trust America,” one interviewee says, “but it trusts Jimmy Carter and his taste in music.” If that had been enough to stabilize the nation, history books might remember him in kinder terms. Until then, “Jimmy Carter Rock & Roll President” is a welcome attempt to correct the record. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“I Am Woman” (directed by Unjoo Moon)
Distributor: Quiver Distribution
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various VOD and streaming platforms

The current spat of music biopics could use more direction like Unjoo Moon’s, which understands how much can be telegraphed through the sheer grace of a good performance within an even better performance. And the genre could use more stars like Tilda Cobham-Hervey, compelled to not only find the woman within the star, but to give both of them to power to be strong, invincible, and to roar. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Social Dilemma” (directed by Jeff Orlowski)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Perhaps the single most lucid, succinct, and profoundly terrifying analysis of social media ever created for mass consumption, Jeff Orlowski’s “The Social Dilemma” does for Facebook what his previous documentaries “Chasing Ice” and “Chasing Coral” did for climate change (read: bring compelling new insight to a familiar topic while also scaring the absolute shit out of you). And while the film covers — and somehow manages to contain — a staggering breadth of topics and ramifications, one little sentence is all it takes to lay out the means and ends of the crisis at hand: Russia didn’t hack Facebook, Russia used Facebook. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Unpregnant” (directed by Rachel Lee Goldenberg)
Distributor: HBO Max
Where to Find It: Streaming on HBO Max

While Eliza Hittman’s “Never Rarely Sometimes Always” seems destined to remain the standout in this fledgling — and, yes, necessary and deeply informative — subgenre, Rachel Lee Goldenberg’s film happily illuminates how many other ways this story can be told. Bolstered by winning, real performances from its leads, “Unpregnant” will delight as much as it stings, a sterling reminder of how many stories about this very subject are still demanding to be told. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“I Met a Girl” (directed by Luke Eve)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms

“Indigo Valley” (directed by Jaclyn Bethany)
Distributor: Giant Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms

“Nail in the Coffin: The Fall & Rise of Vampiro” (directed by Michael Paszt)
Distributor: Epic Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms

“Rent-a-Pal” (directed by Jon Stevenson)
Distributor: IFC Midnight
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“Sibyl” (directed by Justine Triet)
Distributor: Music Box Films
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Ultimately, “Sibyl” becomes a brighter, sillier, film-within-a-film spoof of the Woody Allen variety, and sends Sibyl careening further into a black hole of drunken resentment and self-destruction that underserves her character. Still, the movie remains a spirited look at how tension can run high on troubled sets, and gives the ever-talented Hüller the opportunity to elevate the material with her portrayal of the ultimate reckless auteur. There’s much to appreciate about the meta-commentary at the center of this lively work, but “Sibyl” ultimately becomes a victim of the same pressure to deliver a big, showy narrative that its troubled protagonist so desperately wishes she could tell. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Week of September 1 – September 6

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Feels Good Man” (directed by Arthur Jones)
Distributor: Giant Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms

On its surface, Arthur Jones’ “Feels Good Man” is the sympathetic portrait of a man who created a monster, and then (eventually) took it upon himself to reclaim Pepe the Frog as an emblem of peace and love and peeing with your pants around your ankles. But underneath the lucid digital etymology that Jones energetically glues together from a zillion bits of internet detritus — and the warm snippets of original animation that he uses to show Pepe and his animal friends in a gentler light — is a documentary so much bigger than Matt Furie that it threatens to swallow him whole. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“I’m Thinking of Ending Things” (directed by Charlie Kaufman)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

“You can’t fake a thought.” Those words appear twice in the opening paragraphs of Iain Reid’s 2016 novel “I’m Thinking of Ending Things.” You don’t even have to turn the first page before it’s clear why Charlie Kaufman was so drawn to the book, as the filmmaker’s career has always been shaped by a fascination with the tortured — if tragicomic — relationship between the life of the mind and the world that’s filtered through it. Kaufman is obsessed with the cracked echo chamber of human consciousness; with the feeling that everyone is talking to each other through a two-way mirror; with the perverse irony that our inescapable ego-centrism is the one thing we all have in common. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Mulan” (directed by Niki Caro)
Distributor: Disney
Where to Find It: Streaming on Disney+ for an additional fee

Disney’s beloved Princess tales are no stranger to classic mythology, and everything from “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” to “The Princess and the Frog” have pulled liberally from existing material to craft family-friendly animated outings centered on inspirational women. Such was the case with the Mouse House’s 1998 animated hit “Mulan,” which used a centuries-old piece of Chinese folklore to craft the story of the first Asian Disney Princess, complete with requisite musical numbers and even a cute (if later maligned) talking animal pal. “The Ballad of Mulan” has inspired countless adaptations over the years, and while Niki Caro’s live-action update, starring the engaging Yifei Liu, still retains some trappings of its Disney-fication, it’s also a remarkable action epic that carves its own path. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Tenet” (directed by Christopher Nolan)
Distributor: Warner Bros.
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Entering 2020, Christopher Nolan’s “Tenet” was the summer’s most keenly awaited event movie. Eight apocalyptic months on, it’s assumed the mantle of messianic cinema: a project aiming to blow minds, make a bundle, and thereby save the theatrical experience for all mankind. And what kind of picture is it? Big, certainly: IMAX-scaled, and a hefty 150 minutes even after a visibly ruthless edit. It’s clever, too — yes, the palindromic title has some narrative correlation — albeit in an exhausting, rather joyless way. As second comings go, “Tenet” is like witnessing a Sermon on the Mount preached by a savior who speaks exclusively in dour, drawn-out riddles. Any awe is flattened by follow-up questions. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“The 2nd” (directed by Brian Skiba)
Distributor: Momentum Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms

“The Argument” (directed by Robert Schwartzman)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms, plus select theaters

“Critical Thinking” (directed by John Leguizamo)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms, plus virtual cinema options

“Freaks: You’re One of Us” (directed by Felix Binder)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

“Guest House” (directed by Sam Macaroni)
Distributor: Various VOD and digital platforms
Where to Find It: Lionsgate and Grindstone Entertainment Group

“Love, Guaranteed” (directed by Mark Steven Johnson)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

“The Owners” (directed by Julius Berg)
Distributor: RLJE Films
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms, plus select theaters

“Robin’s Wish” (directed by Tylor Norwood)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

“A Step Without Feet” (directed by Lydia Schamschula and Jeremy Glaholt)
Distributor: Kandoo Films
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms, including iTunes, Amazon, GooglePlay, and Spectrum

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

Also available this week:

“Beau Trevail” (directed by Claire Denis)
Distributor: Janus Films (special 4K restoration)
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Check out more information about the rest of the year’s newest releases on the next page.

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